Tagged: Greece

As much as you can

My favourite Cavafy poem is a slightly obscure one. It has always spoken to me on a deeply spiritual level.   As much as you can by C. P. Cavafy Even if you cannot shape your life as you want...

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What’s in a name?

Voilà! In view, a humble vaudevillian veteran, cast vicariously as both victim and villain by the vicissitudes of Fate. This visage, no mere veneer of vanity, is a vestige of the vox populi, now vacant, vanished. However, this valorous visitation of a by-gone vexation, stands vivified and has vowed to vanquish these venal and virulent vermin vanguarding vice and vouchsafing the violently vicious and voracious violation of volition. The only verdict is vengeance; a vendetta, held as a votive, not in vain, for the value and veracity of such shall one day vindicate the vigilant and the virtuous. Verily, this vichyssoise of verbiage veers most verbose, so let me simply add that it is my very good honour to meet you and you may call me V.

— V, in V for Vendetta

Hi. My name is also V. It’s not really. That’s not even a real name! My name is Vangelis. Unless you actually check my ID, which says that my name is Evangelos. It is about at this point that people...

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Ithaca

This is the best and most famous poem by Cavafy. Once, in London, I saw this poem pinned on the wall in the home of a French girl I was visiting. In a Spanish translation! Apparently, a Colombian guy had...

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Beware of Greeks borrowing gifts

It is a question I have to answer almost on a daily basis for quite a while. Everywhere I go, as soon as people find out I am Greek, they ask: what is going on with Greece? There is strong...

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Polis

The city by C. P. Cavafy translated By Edmund Keeley and Philip Sherrard You said: “I’ll go to another country, go to another shore, find another city better than this one. Whatever I try to do is fated to turn...

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